Connect with us

HOME

A Look Inside One of Iran’s Last Underground Cave Villages

Published

on

For most people, when the weather gets cold, they turn on the heat. Others build fires. But in Maymand, Iran, it has been the tradition for over 10,000 years to go underground. One of the many UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Iran is this ancient village, located  900 km. south of Tehran. The village is filled with caves that were carved out of soft rock.

maymand

BBC

The ancient caves served as underground homes for people in the village so they would be able to live and adapt to the extremely cold weather in Maymand during the winter season. There, they stayed underground to avoid the bone-chilling winds and stay warm. However, during summer and early fall, they move to houses with grass thatch roofs to help them survive the almost unbearable heat.

While there were originally 400 caves built 100 centuries ago, only 90 of them remain intact and habitable today.

Each cave measures about two meters in height and twenty square meters in area. Naturally, sizes of the caves differ but the large ones can even hold up to seven rooms.

Maymand

Rodolfo Contreras

People may have lived in the ancient village continuously for over 2,000 years but the manner of cave living in the past compared to the present are extremely different. The current 150 inhabitants of the caves have updated their homes to suit a modern lifestyle. The underground homes are equipped with electricity, allowing the dwellers to use modern appliances like refrigerators and televisions. Water supply and ventilation remain a problem, though, as there is no running water.

Even though the villagers have adopted a fairly modern lifestyle, an increasing number of residents no longer prefer living in caves. Most of them travel and live in neighboring towns to survive the cold winter rather than live underground and only come back to the village during the summer season.

Maymand

BBC

The decreasing population of Maymand’s ancient cave village has prompted the Iranian Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization to work on increasing awareness of Maymand and its residents’ unique lifestyle.

To date, the 10,000-year-old cave village is receiving more tourists every day especially since certain caves were made available for visitors to stay in.

HOME

Bobcat and Fawn Becomes Part of the Family After Being Rescued Together

When animal rescuer George rescued two forest animals, a bobcat and a fawn that he saved from a wildfire near his home, he was nervous because they are normally raised as pets-- or together! [caption id="attachment_108838" align="aligncenter" width="720"] Boredom Therapy[/caption] Fortunately, his fears were unfounded when the bobcat and the fawn immediately adjusted to their uncanny living arrangements and turned...

Published

on

Continue Reading

HOME

Man Learns Priceless Life Lessons While Traveling the World on Almost No Money

While most travelers would naturally set a budget as the topmost priority on their journey Leon Logothetis has survived with zero money. [caption id="attachment_107901" align="aligncenter" width="720"] Davidsbeenhere.com[/caption] Incredibly, 40-year-old Logothetis has visited almost 100 countries since he began his travel escapades back in 2013. It was in the same year when he starred in a Netflix documentary series “The Kindness...

Published

on

Continue Reading