Connect
To Top

The Grateful Dead Tours America for Bee and Butterfly Repopulation


The Grateful Dead, eclectic rock phenomenon formed in the 1960s, is still rocking on despite losing its frontman Jerry Garcia 22 years ago. But this time around, they’re calling themselves Dead and Company and are now avid environmentalists.

the grateful dead

Billboard

Band members Bill Kreutzmann, Mickey Hart and Bob Weir are following the footsteps of their lead vocalist, who was an active advocate of saving honeybees and butterflies. Garcia’s widow, Manasha, recalled of her late husband: “Jerry was an environmentalist who advocated for the preservation of the rainforests and the coral reefs.”

Manasha, a co-founder of The Jerry Garcia Foundation, further shared: “It is a blessing to continue this work in his honor.”

The said foundation has given away the late singer’s colorful pieces of art in donation to HoneyLove, an organization for urban beekeepers, and the Save Our Monarchs Foundation.

Dead and company

uniqueguitar.blogspot.com

Dead and Company will be touring across America with John Mayer, and they will be giving Deadhead fans at each concert venue a simple yet significant way to aid in repopulating honeybees and monarch butterflies.

The band will serve as the program host to multiple charities in the Participation Row, which will hold individual tents for several organizations of various causes. The Jerry Garcia Foundation, which will hold one of said tents, will be giving away free garden pollinator kits and milkweed seeds to the first 300 people to visit the tent.

Dead and Company

Wikipedia

Garcia’s youngest daughter, who also happens to be a co-founder of said foundation, said: “Save Our Monarchs has generously donated thousands of Non-GMO milkweed seed packets and pollinator garden seeds. We are sharing these seeds in hopes that gardens will be planted to nourish butterfly and bee populations across the US.”

The tour takes action at a very opportune time, Garcia’s birthday upcoming birthday early August, as well as the National Pollinator Week on June 1925.

More in Life